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Then and Now

The Saddle at the Summit of Jumbo Grade:

Halfway between Washoe Valley and Virginia City on the old wagon, you can still pick out the remains of the Virginia City Water System Reservoir. When the VC water problem was finally solved in the 1870s by piping water to the town from Marlette Lake high above Lake Tahoe, the pipe ended here. The reservoir acted as a regulator and transition to a flume and later pipes for distribution into Virginia City.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jumbo Ghost Town

Jumbo is located up Jumbo Grade about a mile. It sprang into existence during the Nevada mining boom of 1901-1910. Expectations never lived up to reality and it languished for several more years and was abandoned. All that remains now are some prospect holes, shards of glass and metal. The original photo by Gus Bundy shows a store and hotel/boarding house circa 1945.

South Washoe Valley:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

V&T Entering Eagle Valley

Up behind the Carson Tahoe Hospital complex in north Carson City lies a stretch of Virginia and Truckee Railroad right-of-way that is now a hiking trail. The railroad closed in 1950, so the original photo was taken before that. Highway 395 (580) can be seen in the middle distance. The trailhead is at the intersection of Combs Canyon Dr and Murphy Street.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Virginia City from the Water Flume:

From the reservoir pictured above, a wooden water flume transported water for all needs to Virginia City. These uses included domestic and mine use and firefighting. It was later replaced by pipes on the same route.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View of Gold Hill from the East:

This view shows Gold Hill from “The Divide”, the ridge between Virginia City and Gold Hill. Only a couple original buildings remain from each photo. The most prominent is the V&T Railroad station in the lower right. Not only were brick buildings torn down to build Reno homes, open pit mining in the early 1900s radically changed the view.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More To Come!